Friday, January 19, 2018

The Urban, the Ex-Urban, and the Twilight Zone Between: Part III


A giant hand reaches down to snatch a two urbanites trapped in a vacant small town in “A Stopover in a Quiet Town”. (The Twilight Zone)
And now for the stunning conclusion...

Part three of a three part essay looking at the perception and representation of urban and ex-urban space on television during the late-1950s. Particularly during the five season run of the seminal science-fiction/fantasy prime-time television show The Twilight Zone. If you did not see the episodes when they were originally aired, or you missed the yearly SyFy New Year's marathon, know that this essay contains spoilers.

Read "Part I" and "Part II"

Friday, January 12, 2018

This Week: Jan. 12, 2018



Illustration by SeƱor Salme (Nature)

A round up of some of this weeks most interesting Stories. The Future of Sci-Fi, Wright and Johnson loose preservation battles, and a look at how pencils are made.

Thursday, January 11, 2018

The Urban, the Ex-Urban, and the Twilight Zone Between: Part II

An enraged mob of neighbors ram the one complete shelter in the neighborhood in "The Shelter." (The Twilight Zone)
This is the second part of what will be a three part essay (Originally this was planned to be just two parts) about the perception and representation of urban and ex-urban space on television during the late-1950s. Particularly during the five season run of the seminal science-fiction/fantasy prime-time television show The Twilight Zone. If you did not see the episodes when they were originally aired, or you missed the yearly SyFy New Year's marathon, know that this essay contains spoilers.

Read "Part I" here.

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

The Long Road to Rebuilding Chicago Public Housing

Cabrini Green in 1999, before extensive demolition began. All of Cabrini Green's towers would be demolished by 2011. (Jet Lowe/Wikimidia Commons)
 "From the time of its earliest German settlers, the area now known as Cabrini–Green has been a space of displacement, and more often than not, neglect. The area was first a landing site for European immigrants fleeing poverty and famine in their home countries—first German, then Swedish, followed by Irish, and lastly settled by Sicilians, the area was known as Little Hell. The fire spewing stacks of the People’s Gas Light & Coke Co. plant and squalid conditions made the name unfortunately appropriate. By the early 20th century the area became known as Little Sicily, despite few improvements to living conditions."